This is how I define myself: Feminist. Biology major at The College of William and Mary. Writer. Literature enthusiast. Virginian. How you will define me depends entirely on your own perceptions and life experiences.
Install Theme

fromthepagecandles:

From the Page candles are all inspired from novels to give you a taste of your favorite fictional worlds! Special tin sale happening right now— marked down to $8. Get them here!

(via mcdubs42)

sabrielshipping-charliebartlett:

"We’re preparing you for the real world"

I don’t meant to alarm you but

the real world has calculators

(via mcdubs42)

ikaythegod:

Revolution is not a one-time event.
— Audre Lorde

ikaythegod:

Revolution is not a one-time event.

— Audre Lorde

(via the-library-and-step-on-it)

thefictionologist:

“It’s shaming sometimes, how the body will not, or cannot, lie about emotions. Who, for decorum’s sake, has ever slowed his heart, or muted a blush?” -Ian McEwan, On Chesil Beach

thefictionologist:

“It’s shaming sometimes, how the body will not, or cannot, lie about emotions. Who, for decorum’s sake, has ever slowed his heart, or muted a blush?” -Ian McEwan, On Chesil Beach

(via the-library-and-step-on-it)

house-of-gnar:

False color SEM’s of various pathogens | ZEISS Microscopy

  • (1) Bubonic plague bacteria (yellow) are shown in the digestive system of a rat flea (purple).
  • (2) Q-fever bacteria (yellow).
  • (3) Human T cell (blue) under attack by HIV (yellow).
  • (4) Chlamydia trachomatis (green).
  • (5) String-like viral Ebola particles emerging from a lysed cell.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

we-are-star-stuff:

Where Will The World’s Water Conflicts Erupt?
As droughts intensify around the world, the stand-off over who gets access to which water sources is becoming more and more fraught. Here are the places around the globe where the competition for water has already begun playing itself out.
You can check out the full map — along with information about just what happened in those conflicts — over at Popular Science. [via]

we-are-star-stuff:

Where Will The World’s Water Conflicts Erupt?

As droughts intensify around the world, the stand-off over who gets access to which water sources is becoming more and more fraught. Here are the places around the globe where the competition for water has already begun playing itself out.

You can check out the full map — along with information about just what happened in those conflicts — over at Popular Science. [via]

we-are-star-stuff:

Virgin births: Do we need sex to reproduce?
Fatherless pregnancies happen in nature more than we thought, so what’s stopping human beings from doing the same?
It’s hard to be a woman. As if doing the reproductive heavy lifting wasn’t bad enough, nature played a cosmic prank in making women need men to complete the task, and giving them a limited window in which to have children.
Perhaps it would be simpler if women could go it alone. After all, not all animals are so hung up on sex. As New Scientist reported earlier this year, virgin births in nature are common. The females of several large and complex animals, such as lizards and sharks, can reproduce without males, a process called parthenogenesis – and now we’re realising it happens in the wild more often than we thought.
So could humans learn this biological trick, allowing women to fall pregnant on their own schedule – without men getting in the way?
It’s a given that, at the very least, women need sperm if they are to conceive. But there’s no reason why that source of sperm ought to be a man. Ten years ago, Japanese researchers unveiled a mouse that had two mothers but no father. Named Kaguya, after a mythical moon princess born in a bamboo stalk, she was created in a laboratory by combining genetic material from two female mice.
With a little bit of help, stem cells from a female donor can be induced to grow into sperm cells – something that would never normally occur. So it might be possible to create a child from two mothers, each of whom contributed half the genetic material. Of course, it’s not quite that simple, as Dr Allan Pacey, a reproductive biologist at the University of Sheffield, explains: “We can make something that looks like a sperm cell down a microscope, but whether it is programmed genetically in the same way is a really difficult thing to establish. I don’t know if there’s a way to check that except to use the sperm and see if the babies develop normally. You can do that in rats and mice but it’s a big step potentially to do that in a human.”
Even if researchers could clear that roadblock, a partner is still required. What if women didn’t need a second person?
In the wild, most females that resort to parthenogenesis do so only when it is strictly necessary – typically when they have become isolated from any males. Should several female komodo dragons wash up on a virgin island, they’ll be able produce males and kick start a brand new colony. Likewise, parthenogenesis in sharks came to light after several incidents in which lone females kept in aquariums inexplicably fell pregnant. But these are testing times for the animals. “Most large animals do not reproduce asexually, because evolutionarily it is not in their interest to do so,” says Pacey. They lose the genetic diversity that keeps a population healthy, he explains.
In theory, it might be possible to produce a child from one woman’s genetic material in the laboratory. The price they would pay, however, would be an alarming genetic bottleneck. When a gene pool is small, the risk of birth defects and other illnesses rises. Take the European royal families, nearly all of which are in some way related. Prognathism, a deformity that causes the lower jaw to jut out, is so common within the European royals that they lent the condition its common name, the Habsburg lip. Poor Prince Charles II of Spain suffered such an extended jaw that he could not even eat properly. In a normal population this condition would be diluted out, but in the tightly-knit European royals it emerged again and again.
Just as inbreeding reduces genetic diversity of a population, self-fertilisation can reduce the genetic diversity of your offspring. If you chose to reproduce entirely on your own, your child would only have one parent, and thus half the genetic diversity available to a normal child. Each subsequent generation of single-parent reproduction would continue that trend, with the increasing risk that normally hidden defects would surface. In this manner, your offspring would suffer a collapse in genetic diversity far worse than any European royal faced. “It’s not a good road to go down,” says Pacey. “You would only really want to do this for one generation or two.”
[Continue Reading →]

we-are-star-stuff:

Virgin births: Do we need sex to reproduce?

Fatherless pregnancies happen in nature more than we thought, so what’s stopping human beings from doing the same?

It’s hard to be a woman. As if doing the reproductive heavy lifting wasn’t bad enough, nature played a cosmic prank in making women need men to complete the task, and giving them a limited window in which to have children.

Perhaps it would be simpler if women could go it alone. After all, not all animals are so hung up on sex. As New Scientist reported earlier this year, virgin births in nature are common. The females of several large and complex animals, such as lizards and sharks, can reproduce without males, a process called parthenogenesis – and now we’re realising it happens in the wild more often than we thought.

So could humans learn this biological trick, allowing women to fall pregnant on their own schedule – without men getting in the way?

It’s a given that, at the very least, women need sperm if they are to conceive. But there’s no reason why that source of sperm ought to be a man. Ten years ago, Japanese researchers unveiled a mouse that had two mothers but no father. Named Kaguya, after a mythical moon princess born in a bamboo stalk, she was created in a laboratory by combining genetic material from two female mice.

With a little bit of help, stem cells from a female donor can be induced to grow into sperm cells – something that would never normally occur. So it might be possible to create a child from two mothers, each of whom contributed half the genetic material. Of course, it’s not quite that simple, as Dr Allan Pacey, a reproductive biologist at the University of Sheffield, explains: “We can make something that looks like a sperm cell down a microscope, but whether it is programmed genetically in the same way is a really difficult thing to establish. I don’t know if there’s a way to check that except to use the sperm and see if the babies develop normally. You can do that in rats and mice but it’s a big step potentially to do that in a human.”

Even if researchers could clear that roadblock, a partner is still required. What if women didn’t need a second person?

In the wild, most females that resort to parthenogenesis do so only when it is strictly necessary – typically when they have become isolated from any males. Should several female komodo dragons wash up on a virgin island, they’ll be able produce males and kick start a brand new colony. Likewise, parthenogenesis in sharks came to light after several incidents in which lone females kept in aquariums inexplicably fell pregnant. But these are testing times for the animals. “Most large animals do not reproduce asexually, because evolutionarily it is not in their interest to do so,” says Pacey. They lose the genetic diversity that keeps a population healthy, he explains.

In theory, it might be possible to produce a child from one woman’s genetic material in the laboratory. The price they would pay, however, would be an alarming genetic bottleneck. When a gene pool is small, the risk of birth defects and other illnesses rises. Take the European royal families, nearly all of which are in some way related. Prognathism, a deformity that causes the lower jaw to jut out, is so common within the European royals that they lent the condition its common name, the Habsburg lip. Poor Prince Charles II of Spain suffered such an extended jaw that he could not even eat properly. In a normal population this condition would be diluted out, but in the tightly-knit European royals it emerged again and again.

Just as inbreeding reduces genetic diversity of a population, self-fertilisation can reduce the genetic diversity of your offspring. If you chose to reproduce entirely on your own, your child would only have one parent, and thus half the genetic diversity available to a normal child. Each subsequent generation of single-parent reproduction would continue that trend, with the increasing risk that normally hidden defects would surface. In this manner, your offspring would suffer a collapse in genetic diversity far worse than any European royal faced. “It’s not a good road to go down,” says Pacey. “You would only really want to do this for one generation or two.”

[Continue Reading →]

Melancholy people have two reasons for being so: they don’t know or they hope.

— Albert Camus, “The Absurd Man” (via heteroglossia)

(via eden-is-burning)

Waters Edge »» Thomas Hanks

(Source: thomashanks-photography.co.uk, via allinye)



First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.

I would love a source for this, though.

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

this is the most important thing right now.

I would love a source for this, though.

(Source: hadeiadel, via itsforsciencejohn)

octoberspirit:

concept art - the prince of egypt, 1998, dreamworks animation

(via itsforsciencejohn)

thekillersnews:

The Killers performed ‘On Top’ at The Independent in San Francisco last night.

This is the first time ‘On Top’ has been performed since March 29, 2009.  Notably, Ronnie Vannucci featured on guitar during this performance while Danielle Haim, of Haim, featured on drums.

UPDATE:

A version with better audio has surfaced.

mandopony:

arewefadingout:

videohall:

Wait a second, am I tripping balls?

HELP I CANNOT STOP LAUGHING

Sometimes life is just beautiful.

He just fades into the distance, like a dream

(via fistingmyself)

hot-topic-trash-baby:

I want to be spoiled but I also feel extremely guilty when people use money on me

(via fistingmyself)